Weekly Watch Photo – A. Lange & Söhne Still Lifes

calendar | ic_dehaze_black_24px By Frank Geelen | ic_query_builder_black_24px 2 minute read
A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 fruits

This week we’ll start with some rather unusual watch photos, or should I say pieces of art. The photos that we present you today are made by A. Lange & Söhne’s forum moderator at Timezone.com, Edwin. A few weeks ago we used some of his photos of the A. LAnge & Söhne Richard Lange Pour le Mérite and today we’ll show you some 16th and 17th century style still lifes featuring Edwin’s Datograph, Lange 1 and the mighty Double Split.

Last week’s photographer, GEO, was probably one of the very first to share extremely stylish photos of his watches. Edwin, who started a bit later, is probably one of the best amateur still life photographers that we came across. Although it is weird to call this amateur level. The photos we showed you the other week were still lifes with food, today’s photos are still lifes in the style of the 17th century Dutch masters, like Ambrosius Bosschaert, Balthasar van der Ast, or 18th century French painter Anne Vallayer-Coster.

A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 fruits

These first two photos show the A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 “stealth” as it is nicknamed. This is the platinum version features a solid silver dial that was treated with Rhodium, which has a very bright grey color.

Below a photo of the Double Split that we comprehensively reviewed for you here. The Double Split is on an IWC/Santoni strap that so beautifully matches the black dial and white metal. IWC introduced these Santoni straps for the Portofino 8-Days and we showed them to you before – click here – also on Edwin’s Double Split.

A. Lange & Söhne Double Split

We just love these beautiful photos of beautiful timepieces and we hope you like them as much as we do. They create a lust, an appetite, for these fine watches. Of course not to eat them, but to admire them, enjoy their beauty and of course preferably on your own wrist. We got some more photos for you to enjoy. A HUGE thanks to Edwin Heusinkveld for his brilliant photos!

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