Introducing

Singer Reimagined Flytrack Prime Edition

Tachymeter, telemeter or pulsometer… Choose your favourite Singer watch with sequential flyback.

calendar | ic_dehaze_black_24px By Xavier Markl | ic_query_builder_black_24px 3 min read |

Singer Reimagined appeared on the independent watchmaking scene in 2017 with a fantastic chronograph, the Track1. Designed to reimagine this essential function, powered by the impressive Agengraphe calibre, Track1 was crowned by several industry accolades, including the prestigious GPHG award for the best chronograph in 2018. Following the presentation of a concept watch last year, Singer Reimagined now introduces Flytrack. This second collection also reimagines the chronograph, but this time with radical minimalism. The watch launches with three exclusive 10-piece limited editions available via subscription now.

Singer Flytrack was designed to provide one of the most instantaneous ways of measuring short elapsed times, allowing you to measure repetitive, sequential events. The original display of this time-only watch is a bit puzzling at first. But just like the brand’s first model, Track1, it focuses on essential functions. The hour indication is relegated to the periphery via a rotating ring while the minutes are displayed traditionally in the centre. 

But mostly, there is a special sweep seconds hand. Thanks to the pusher at 2 o’clock, it can be used as a flyback chronograph hand. Pushing and releasing the button will instantly reset and restart the central seconds. As such, it captures the functionality of a flyback chronograph, on-demand, when you need it, without going through the traditional sequence of start-stop-reset. It can also be used to “zero-reset” your watch’s sweep seconds hand easily and precisely for a precise time indication.

From a design perspective, Singer Flytrack clearly takes its cues from Track1. The dynamic and elegant barrel-shaped case has its crown located at 4 o’clock. It launches with the Prime Edition in three distinct models of 10 units each with a micro-blasted grade 5 titanium case. A hand-applied gold plate indicates the watch’s individual limited-edition number.

Each with its distinctive style, the three models feature a different scale on their dial, with either a tachymeter, a telemeter or a pulsometer. The tachymeter allows you to measure speed. Starting the seconds hand at a first mile or kilometre marker allows you to calculate your average speed by the second. The pulsometer is used to measure the heart rate, in this instance, counting 15 pulsations. Last, the telemeter enables you to determine your distance from a phenomenon that is both visible and audible, for instance, a lightning storm. It was also used by soldiers observing artillery. 

This original concept may recall watches such as the Omega Chronostop, the Heuer Vintage Regatta Timer or the Zenith Retrotimer and it required the creation of a specific movement. Developed with Agenhor, the calibre AG6364 is derived from the prestigious Agengraphe. Visible via the exhibition caseback, this superb hand-wound movement comprises 314 components, runs at 21,600 vibrations per hour and boasts 55 hours of power reserve. From a technical perspective, a large lever keeps the seconds permanently engaged. Pressing the push-piece, the lever releases and disengages the clutch. The latter is provided by triangular teeth with a ratio of 1:3 to limit jumping forwards or backwards. The lever also acts as a reset hammer to reset the seconds via a heart-shaped cam in the centre. The watches are presented either on a calfskin or fabric leather strap fitted with a pin buckle.

The Singer Reimagined Flytrack Prime collection will be available by subscription on the brand’s website and at its retailers from 2 November 2020 at 4 PM Geneva time. Deliveries are planned for April 2021. The watch will be priced at CHF 26,500, which includes a 3-year warranty and international shipping. For more information, please visit www.singerreimagined.com.

2 responses

  1. Exactly what Ray said. If I was contemplating a watch in that price range it wouldn’t be a titanium flyback monopusher but something more complicated in precious metal from a more established brand. I don’t understand how they even begin to justify the pricing.

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