Hands-on Mido Ocean Star Diver 600, A Robust and Accessible Dive Watch

The most technical watch in the Ocean Star collection so far.
calendar | ic_dehaze_black_24px By Xavier Markl | ic_query_builder_black_24px 2 minute read

Mido has been celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2018 and the history of the Mido Ocean Star also dates back to last century, during the early 1940s. Naturally, at the time, the Ocean Star was not yet the modern mechanical dive watch it is today and had little in common with the latest model in the family, the most technical so far. Let’s take a look at this new Mido Ocean Star Diver 600.

The Ocean Star Diver 600 is water-resistant to 600m / 1,968ft which will exceed the most extreme needs. It incorporates a helium relief valve and its push down bezel (the bezel can be pushed in and feels springy) has engraved numerals filled with Super-LumiNova. Diving times can be read even in the murkiest waters.

A small window on the side of the case next to the helium relief valve releases any excess water trapped inside the rotating bezel mechanism to prevent corrosion. The crown is screwed-down and nested in a crown guard, a traditional feature for a tool/dive watch. Overall, this watch features most of the devices required on a solid and reliable professional diver’s watch and, considering the price, its construction is neat, precise and pleasant.

The Ocean Star Diver 600 is 43.5mm in diameter but wears smaller than the diameter suggests. The solid, screwed caseback is engraved with a polished starfish in relief, the symbol of the Ocean Star collection. Two versions are proposed: an all-steel version with a deep blue dial and a steel bracelet and a sleek black DLC-coated steel version with a black dial and a rubber strap.

As you would expect from any serious dive watch, the dial is clean and legible. It features broad baton-style applied indexes with white SLN paired with large, well-contrasted luminous hands. The Mido logo is in relief, which is a nice touch. The sapphire crystal features double-sided anti-reflective coating to increase display contrast and legibility.

Inside is the automatic Mido Calibre 80Si – an improved ETA movement, which is used by several Swatch Group brands. It really has a lot to offer at this price point. Based on the ETA C07.821, it boasts a robust 80-hour power reserve (vs. the standard 40h autonomy for entry/mid-range) and a silicon hairspring vibrating at 21,600 vibrations per hour. Its precision is certified by the COSC, the official Chronometer certification agency of Switzerland – again, an interesting feature for a watch priced well below 2k Swiss Francs.

The Mido Ocean Star Diver 600 retails for CHF 1,590 or USD 1,700. Overall, and like all Mido watches, it offers great value for the money. This functional diver has a clean and pragmatic layout. It exudes quality and the technical specifications comply with rigorous demands: 600m water-resistance, ceramic push-down unidirectional bezel, helium-relief valve and a COSC-certified movement with 80 hours of power reserve… For more information, please visit www.midowatches.com or their e-shop here.

1 response

  1. I own a Mido and am familiar with their line-up. In my opinion they make good watches at a great price. On another website, several people made snarky comments about this model’s “generic” styling. It is a diver’s watch. That’s what Diver’s watches look like. I have two issues with this watch; it is too big and it has a date-wheel. If it was 40mm and dateless, I would own this by now. However, I am sure sales will not be hurt as so many people seem to have watch dysmorphia syndrome.
    The “bezel sluice” is a great idea and the hands produce great legibility. With a chronometer movement, this is a great deal. I just have one question: does the bracelet have micro-adjustment?

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