Hands-on Delma Blue Shark II 3000m – A True Diving Instrument

Still running even when you have 3 kilometres of water above your head!
calendar | ic_dehaze_black_24px By Xavier Markl | ic_query_builder_black_24px 2 minute read |
Delma Blue Shark II 3000m Dive Watch

A family-owned company based in Lengnau near Biel, Delma has been manufacturing watches for almost a century now. The brand also has a long tradition of crafting dive watches. Launched in 1969, the Periscope was its first timepiece with increased water-resistance. In 1975, the Shell Star was its first professional diver. Fast forward, the Blue Shark II we are reviewing here is Delma’s most rugged and robust divers’ watch: a high-performance, functional watch able to withstand the pressure exerted at a depth of 3,000m or 9,900ft!

This beast of a watch features an oversized case measuring 47mm in diameter and 18.85mm thick. On the wrist, it actually wears smaller thanks to its ergonomic design. The case band is relatively thin in comparison to the case height and the sloping lugs contour the wrist for optimal comfort. A 6.8mm thick anti-reflective (AR) sapphire crystal (that’s a really thick crystal) ensures water-resistance to extreme depths and excellent legibility.

Delma Blue Shark II 3000m Dive Watch

As one would expect to find with a professional dive watch, it features a unidirectional rotating bezel. Featuring 120 clicks, it operates smoothly while its notches provide good grip. The screw-down crown and screwed back ensure long-term water-resistance. At 9 o’clock, the helium relief valve housed in the case band protects the watch against overpressure during the ascent and return to the surface.

The bold, quirky design of the Delma Blue Shark II stands out with its dial, flange, broad retro-style hands and bezel highlighted with striking orange accents. The use of luminescent material (green and orange lume) provides maximum legibility in low light. This also creates a sharp contrast with the black textured dial. Overall, there is a lot going on but it is functional and powerful.

Inside ticks an automatic ETA 2824 displaying the hours, minutes, seconds and the date. This ubiquitous and reliable workhorse operates at a modern 28,800 vibrations per hour with a 38-hour power reserve.

The Delma Blue Shark II comes with a sturdy steel bracelet. This virile H-link bracelet is thick, heavy and really feels strong. It is nicely integrated into the case and secured with hexagonal screws. It is closed by a massive folding clasp (with adjustment system). The wooden presentation box incorporates an extra rubber strap and strap/bracelet changing tools.

Obviously, the depth rating of the Delma Blue Shark II (and other deep divers) by far exceeds the most extreme needs. Nonetheless, there is something really appealing about these specifications and the engineering behind the creation of such watches. Its design is equally striking with its oversized case and bold colours… definitely not for the faint-hearted.

Delma Blue Shark II 3000m Dive Watch

The Delma Blue Shark II is presented in steel for the regular collection (priced at CHF 1,800) and a black DLC-coated steel 99-piece limited edition was also released in 2017 (priced at CHF 2,100). For more information, please visit www.delma.ch.

8 responses

  1. 47mm diameter x 18.85mm height…Real beast…And high price for a basic ETA 2824.

  2. „Delma has been manufacturing watches for almost a century now.“ – it‘s indeed an impressive watch, but I am not sure if Delma actually is the company manufacturing it (there are at least three brands offering the same watch). Nothing wrong with that, but maybe change „manufacturing“ to „offering“?

  3. All well and good…even the price is fair for this capable diver but the size is over the top and makes wearing it clownish.
    Try 42-43mm next time.

  4. I was really surprised at the price. They’re certainly not gouging. And for someone with 8.5″ wrists this could be perfect. For most of us though, it is simply too big, heavy, awkward and pointless. If they shrink this package down to 40mm and give us 200m WR, this would be a real winner.
    And can watch sites and watchmakers PLEASE READ the actual ISO specs for a dive watch?
    A WR test to 125m is sufficient.

  5. @watchcollector well they do.even If they do not manufacture cases and movements themselves (as many brands in the industry) . The company activities even incorporates a private label activity for third parties.

  6. Some of us have big wrists and/or like chunky watches. This Watch has an incredible quality for the price. Please don´t compare it to junk like Invicta.

  7. what’s wrong with Invicta ?,and why all the “Rolex” gays are afraid of it?,maybe it is damn good quality of Invicta for small money and anyone who owns a Rolex has a thorn in the eye because of it,Invicta name means something !, what does the name Rolex mean? NOTHING. This watch “Delma” (as the name also means something) shown it is a little big but this is a pure professional diving Watch-3000M. !!, against the Invicta is a “SPORT watch -200M. How in hell can you compare these two watches?,Showing just one thing, you can’t much about watches,This is like comparing a parachute to an umbrella,thanks from me, greetings.

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