Roger Dubuis Pulsion Chronograph

Short before this year’s SIHH we were the first to show you a picture of the new Roger Dubuis Pulsion Flying Tourbillon. During the show Roger Duibuis introduced an entire new Pulsion collection and it looks great. Lots of technicalities and an avant-garde design. My favorite: the Pulsion Chronograph. 

The Pulsion collection comprises of sporty high-end watches with very striking details. The dial is mostly absent, so the magnificent in-house movement is visible and the crystal is really something that I’ve never seen before.

The ‘dial’ only covers the perimeter of what can be considered the dial or face. At 12 and 6 o’clock the hour markers are black DLC coated applied Arabic numerals. The dial around the perimeter, roughly covers from 1 to 5 o’clock and from 7 to 11 o’clock and is also black DLC coated over a Geneva striping (Côte de Genève) finished. The hour makers are applied double stick makers in gold, matching the color of the case. The middle part of the face shows the movement’s main plate that is finished with circular graining (pèrlage).

Furthermore the face also has two subdials; one for the subsidiary second hand (left) and one is a 30 minute chronograph register (right). The two subdials, or at least the perimeter of these subdials, are attached to the two ‘dials’ on either side of the face. They are filled with a ‘smoked’ sapphire disk, that beautifully matches with the black DLC dial parts, and have white painted markers. Through the ‘smoked’  sapphire the movement’s main plate is visible. These are just a few of the many details of a very complex dial… or face… or what shall we actually call it? Anyhow, it looks great and one of the pleasures of such a dial/face is that it will give much visual joy for a long time.

The movement that is visible through the dial/face is a column-wheel movement with an automatic micro-rotor winding, called caliber RD680. Roger Dubuis designed and perfected the movement and like all Roger Dubuis movements, it’s manufactured in-house.

Like all models produced by Roger Dubuis, the Pulsion Chronograph complies with all the latest requirements for the Geneva Seal (Poinçon de Genève). This mark of quality, issued by the Canton of Geneva to a small number of manufacturers, represents an official guarantee that the watch and its functions operate correctly. It also certifies that its mechanical watch movement is made by hand, assembled and regulated in Geneva and that it complies with the strict requirements laid down for the watch manufacture.

Did you know that Roger Dubuis is the only watch Manufacture to produce 100% of its movements in accordance with the criteria of the Geneva Seal?

The Roger Dubuis Pulsion offers an intriguing multi-layer dial, a sublime movement and another thing that will probably give the future owners some nice mesmerizing moments, is the crystal. Take a good look…

The sapphire crystal is screwed directly onto the case!

Besides the fact that it looks great, it also enabled Roger Dubuis to engrave the Arabic numerals under the crystal and to fill them with luminescent material. The 44 mm case is water resistant to 100 meters, so you can take it for a plunge and that’s exactly how Roger Dubuis intended the Pulsion collection… for active men.

Some facts of Calibre RD680:

  • Self-winding mechanical movement with micro – rotor
  • Number of parts: 261, of which 42 jewels
  • Rhodium-plated finished with Côtes de Genève decoration
  • Column-wheel chronograph
  • Height: 6.30 mm
  • Frequency: 4 Hz (28,800 vph)
  • Power reserve: 52 hours

Unfortunately my own photos were not that good, so I choose to use the press photos provided by Roger Dubuis, however let me share one photo with the Roger Dubuis Pulsion Chronograph on the wrist.

Please visit the Roger Dubuis website or official Facebook page for more information.

 

Frank Geelen

Frank Geelen is an expert on Haute Horlogerie and his horological heart beats faster from beautiful hand-finished mechanical movements. He loves to explain all technical details of complications like tourbillons, minute repeaters, constant force escapements and column-wheel chronographs and he has been doing that for more than seven years. Besides publishing daily here at Monochrome Watches, Frank also writes for several other publications, both online and offline.

View all articles by Frank Geelen

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