The ALUMINIUM Watch – F.P. Journe launches the Octa Sport

In June 2011 F.P. Journe launched the first watch that was made of aluminium. That is, the case and bracelet were made of aluminium; the movement was still made from 18k rose gold. Today F.P. Journe launches a new watch, the Octa Sport, that is made of aluminium… entirely made of aluminium! 

The Centigraph Sport is the aluminium version of one of the most beautiful chronographs ever created and when Journe launched it last year I was very curious how he made this metal scratch and corrosion proof. Apparently he did manage this because today he launches the Octa Sport with a movement made of an aluminium alloy used in the aeronautics.

Thinking of aluminium,  the word ‘light’ comes to mind. And indeed the new Octa Sport is light, very light in fact as it weights only 53 grams! Because of its lightness, the 42 mm large and 11.6 mm thick aluminium case will be very comfortable on the wrist, and as Journe says it will be perfect for a sporty lifestyle. To increase night legibility, the hands and hour index dots treated with super luminova.

Displayed on the grey dial, are a central hour and minute hand, small seconds at 6 o’clock, a big date at 1 o’clock and a day/night indicator at 9. The power reserve indicator between 10 and 11 o’clock, tells you how much of the 120 hours of power reserve is left.

While all other movement from F.P. Journe are made from 18K rose gold, this is the first movement ever to be created from aluminium. The aluminium was treated in order to make the aluminium scratch resistant and give it anti-corrosive and anti-allergic properties.

Although the Octa Sport aluminum movement, is made of a aluminium alloy, it still preserves all typical features of all F.P. Journe Octa calibers, with a five day power reserve and a variable inertia balance wheel for an optimal rate stability. The rotor of the Octa Sport is also made of aluminum alloy, but in order to increase inertia and thus to increase the winding speed, a tungsten segment was added as winding mass.

Rubber inserts are fixed to the sides of the case to protect the watch from any shocks. If you choose for the bracelet, the end of each bracelet link is also fixed with rubber ends. The crown and the folding clasp, engraved with the F.P.Journe signature, are also covered with a rubber coating.

Octa Sport – Technical Specifications

  • Automatic movement – Calibre FPJ 1300-3 – made of aluminium alloy
  • Unidirectional automatic winding - Off centre winding rotor in Titanium with Tungsten segment
  • Balance with 4 adjustable inertia weights (10.10 mg/cm2)
  • Anachron free-sprung flat balance spring, with mobile stud holder
  • Frequency : 21’600 Alt/h, 3 Hz
  • Autonomy: 120 hours
  • Decoration: circular Côtes de Genève on bridges, partly circular graining on baseplate, polished screw heads with chamfered slots, chamfered and circular grained wheels, steel components are hand polished and chamfered
  • Number of parts Movement without dial 286 - Jewels 40
  • Weight Total weight 53 g
  • Movement alone 11 g
  • Sapphire glass sub dial 2 g

Judging from the specification this is a very impressive watch and build according to the highest quality standard. And that is one thing, that F.P. Journe does not need a COSC or Geneva Seal for. His own standards are simply enough and they really are.

I’m very interested I getting some hands-on time with the new Octa Sport and Centigraph Sport and if this happens, I will of course report about it.

More information can be found through the F.P. Journe website.

 

Frank Geelen

Frank Geelen is an expert on Haute Horlogerie and his horological heart beats faster from beautiful hand-finished mechanical movements. He loves to explain all technical details of complications like tourbillons, minute repeaters, constant force escapements and column-wheel chronographs and he has been doing that for more than seven years. Besides publishing daily here at Monochrome Watches, Frank also writes for several other publications, both online and offline.

View all articles by Frank Geelen

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